Product Information

pdfOligoMix® is a versatile, innovative, custom product for genomics discoveries. We synthesize thousands of oligonucleotide sequences in massive parallel on a microarray chip and then cleave the oligos, releasing them into solution in a single microtube. Synthesis occurs via standard DMT chemistry assuring efficient stepwise yield and a high quality final product. The product is delivered as a pool in a single microtube – ready for use in your experiment.

  1. Economical – At less than 0.8¢ per base, OligoMix is about 20 times more cost and time efficient than conventional oligos. Delivered in a single microtube, it enables inexpensive genome-scale experiments.
  2. Customizable – Customers can specify each oligonucleotide sequence (lengths up to 150-mers). We can synthesize oligonucleotides in OligoMix containing labels, such as terminus phosphate, amino and thiol with linkers, biotin, FAM or other dyes.
  3. Reliable – Innovative microfluidic array platform ensures high quality synthesis. Multiple QC steps are implemented at various stages of OligoMix manufacturing. OligoMix is subjected to both hybridization and qRT-PCR assays to assess final quality.
  4. Simple & Fast – Download our excel spreadsheet order form, paste in your sequences and email back to us. Product can be delivered in 1-2 weeks.

Microfluidic Array Platform—in situ Synthesis

OligoMix® achieves high synthesis purity because it is produced via an advanced microarray synthesis technology (µParaflo®) that integrates a photo-generated acid (PGA) chemistry, digital photolithography (DLP), and advanced microfluidics to enable high throughput parallel synthesis of custom DNA microarrays. The PGA chemistry enables the use of standard oligo building blocks, and eliminates the need for any specially modified nucleotides which may exhibit lower coupling efficiency. DLP technology enables programmable synthesis of custom sequences and the µParaflo® microfluidic device contains the synthesis reactions each within a picoliter-scale reaction chamber, producing more uniform synthesis than reactions performed on the open surface of a slide.

Biomarker

  • Conventional Chemicals
  • Established Synthesis Processes

  • Efficient Stepwise Yield
  • Quality Final Product

Synthesis Technology References

  • Gao X, Yu PY, LeProust E, Sonigo L, Pellois JP, Zhang H. (1998) Oligonucleotide synthesis using solution photogenerated acids. Journal of the American Chemical Society 120, 12698-12699 [abstract].
  • Srivannavit O, Gulari M, Gulari E, LeProust E, Pellois JP, Gao X, Zhou X. (2004) Design and fabrication of microwell array chips for a solution-based, photogenerated acid-catalyzed parallel oligonucleotide DNA synthesis. Sensors and Actuators A. 116, 150-160 [abstract].
  • Zhou X, Cai S, Hong A, Yu P, Sheng N, Srivannavit O, Yong Q, Muranjan S, Rouillard JM, Xia Y, Zhang X, Xiang Q, Ganesh R, Zhu Q, Makejko A, Gulari E, Gao X. (2004) Microfluidic picoarray synthesis of oligodeoxynucleotides and simultaneously assembling of multiple DNA sequences. Nucleic Acids Research 32, 5409-5417 [abstract].
  • Tian J, Gong H, Sheng N, Zhou X, Gulari E, Gao X, Church G. (2004) Accurate multiplex gene synthesis from programmable DNA chips. Nature 432, 1050-1054 [abstract].

Synthetic Biology Applications

Modern synthetic biology involves not only the construction of existing genes to elicit their functions, but also designed mutation and sequence shuffling to create new, functional gene constructs which perform as biomolecular machines. One limitation for gene synthesis is the cost of making the building blocks (oligonucleotides) that are assembled together to make genes. Multiplex, parallel DNA construction on a large scale requires pools of large numbers of short synthetic oligos.

Microarray technology provides a fast and economical means for massive parallel synthesis of oligos and the µParaflo® technology represents a significant advancement in microarray synthesis technology. Large numbers of DNA constructs of designed sequences can be synthesized and then simultaneously assembled by joining the short synthetic oligos with multiplex reactions. There are challenges associated with gene synthesis from complex oligo pools such as: synthesis errors, pool sequence complexity and low yield per sequence, but over the past decade several methods have been developed to overcome these.

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Block-Based Gene Assembly4 – Combination of hybridization-based oligo selection and parallel amplification into a single process that allows simple and cost-efficient production of unlimited amounts of high-quality building materials directly from unpurified pools of microarray-synthesized oligos.

Megacloning3 – Oligos synthesized from microarrays are “read” by next-generation sequencing to identify those with desired sequences. The DNA is then sorted and retrieved selectively.

  • In 2 methods, results were compared and demonstrated to be similar to column synthesized oligos4,5.
  • ”The genes constructed from microarray-synthesized oligos using our block-based gene assembly protocol were found to be indistinguishable from genes assembled by the standard protocol from the high-quality column-synthesized oligos”4

 

Product Descriptionmix of DNA oligonucleotide sequences
Number of Oligosthousands of sequences or more per tube
Oligo Formsingle stranded (ss); desalted and ready for reaction
Lengthup to 150 mers (inquire for longer oligos)
5’ or 3’ Terminus Modificationsphosphate, fluorescent dyes, biotin, linkers, and others
Internal Modificationsmodified DNA or RNA bases
Yield*tens of attomoles per sequence and a total of sub-fmols per OligoMix® tube
Price(see www.lcsciences.com/oligomix)
Delivery14 days

 

 

References
  1. Myllykangas S, Buenrostro JD, Natsoulis G, Bell JM, Ji HP. (2011) Efficient targeted resequencing of human germline and cancer genomes by oligonucleotide selective sequencing. Nat Biotechnol 29, 1024–27.
  2. Eroshenko N, Kosuri S, Marblestone AH, Conway N, Church GM. (2012) Gene Assembly from Chip-Synthesized Oligonucleotides. Current Protocols in Chemical Biology 1–17.
  3. Matzas M, Stähler PF, Kefer N, Siebelt N, Boisguérin V, Leonard JT, Keller A, Stähler CF, Häberle P, Gharizadeh B, Babrzadeh F, Church GM. (2010) High-fidelity gene synthesis by retrieval of sequence-verified DNA identified using high-throughput pyrosequencing. Nat Biotechnol 28(12), 1291-94.
  4. Borovkov AY, Loskutov AV, Robida MD, Day KM, Cano JA, Le Olson T, Patel H, Brown K, Hunter PD, Sykes KF. (2010) High-quality gene assembly directly from unpurified mixtures of microarray-synthesized oligonucleotides. Nucleic Acids Res 38(19), e180.
  5. Zhou, X, Cai S, Hong A, Yu P, Sheng N, Srivannavit O, Yong Q, Muranjan S, Rouillard J M, Xia Y, Zhang X, Xiang Q, Ganesh R, Zhu Q, Makejko A, Gulari E, Gao X. (2004) Microfluidic picoarray synthesis of oligodeoxynucleotides and simultaneously assembling of multiple DNA sequences. Nucleic Acids Res 32, 5409-17.
  6. Tian J, Gong H, Sheng N, Zhou X, Gulari E, Gao X, Church G. (2004) Accurate multiplex gene synthesis from programmable DNA chips. Nature 432, 1050-54.
  7. Sun HH, Zhu C, Wu Y, Guo JF. (2009) De novo synthesis and assembly of multiplex riboswitches in vitro. Biotechnol Prog 25(5), 1228-35.

OligoMix® for Sequence Capture OligoMix® for Library Construction Applications